Portrait of Frances Fiske Marshall

A Grant Wood Celebration!

Happy Birthday, Grant Wood!


GRANT WOOD
Portrait of Frances Fiske Marshall, oil on canvas, 40 1/2" x 28 1/2", 1929

Cedar Rapids Museum of Art, Gift of Frances Marshall Lash, Patricia Marshall Sheehy, Barbara Marshall Hoffman and Jeanne Marshall Byers. 81.11

In honor of the anniversary of Grant Wood's birth and death, the Daily Palette is featuring two of Wood's portraits, one on February 12th and one on February 13th.  Both works of art are owned by the Cedar Rapids Museum of Art in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Grant Wood (February 13, 1891-February 12, 1942) is Iowa's most famous artist and one of the most celebrated American artists of the twentieth century.  He was born near Anamosa, but spent most of his life in Cedar Rapids.  Wood developed an interest in art at a young age, and later advanced his skills at the Minneapolis School of Art and Design, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Académie Julian in Paris.  While he worked in an impressionist style early in his career, he is best known as an American Regionalist.  One of the three major Midwestern Regionalists, a triumvirate that also included John Steuart Curry and Thomas Hart Benton, Wood was devoted to painting the people and landscape of his home state.  While some of his paintings have been criticized as satires of rural life, it is clear that he celebrated Americans and Midwesterners alike through his art, his collection of Americana, and his interest in Midwestern history.

The Cedar Rapids Museum of Art has the world's largest collection of works by Grant Wood.  See a selection from it in Grant Wood: In Focus, an ongoing, permanent collection exhibition.  You can learn more about the artist here, and plan a trip to visit Wood's former home and studio in Cedar Rapids (open April through December) here.

To explore other Grant Wood-related sites and see more of his art, be sure to follow the Grant Wood Trail.  Don't miss a visit to the American Gothic House or  Anamosa, Iowa, the artist's birthplace!

Image courtesy of the Cedar Rapids Museum of Art

This page was first displayed
on February 13, 2015

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